IS Summer Handwriting Fun?

Welcome back to our Summer Handwriting Fun series!  This week we are sharing some very creative ideas that will spark your children’s interest in building handwriting development skills!  Our guest blogger is Stacy Turke, OTR/L, an Occupational Therapist from Michigan!  I think you will find her suggestions helpful and easy to do.  If you think so, too, drop her a note and let her know how much you’ve appreciated them.  Okay, Stacy, you’re on!

 

 

Summer Handwriting Homework

Summer Handwriting Practice

Summer Handwriting Fun!

 

sad student clikerfreevectorimages pixabayFor many kids, this statement is an oxymoron:  how can ANYTHING related to Handwriting be fun?  Good handwriting takes practice, lots and lots of it, and practice of almost any kind is boring.  Plus, kids want to be outside playing in the summer, or inside creating, and just generally having fun with their families and friends.  So a Summer Handwriting Program is a waste of time, right?

 

Not if it’s done well!

 

For kids with handwriting challenges, the writing itself is rarely the whole picture.  Handwriting is a very complex process, combining

  • motor planning,
  • postural control,
  • muscle strength and endurance,
  • joint stability,
  • bilateral coordination/control,
  • attention and focus,
  • visual processing,
  • fine motor skills,
  • eye hand coordination,  PLUS
  • visual and auditory memory

…and all that comes before the child begins to put pencil to paper to write down the language in their mind’s eye.  Practice the skills in these areas, and you’ll help your child maintain and strengthen their ability to write while having fun, without the feel of homework or practice. Who wouldn’t want that?!

 

So what EXACTLY do you do to practice?

There is no concrete, universal “Practice THIS List” because every child’s needs are unique and individual.   So instead of a “prescription,” consider these general areas and suggested activities to create a strong foundation for handwriting, and then get creative!

 

For tons of ideas, visit these Internet spots for ideas:

  • Blogs, such as Handwriting with Katherine (you’re there now!).  Also Google “handwriting,” or any of the skills listed above for more blogs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Pinterest:  Search for “fine-motor skills, handwriting, eye-hand coordination, muscle strengthening for children” – or any of the skills listed above for many “boards” where people have collected activities.  These will also lead you to new sites to explore!   ——–|

 

 

  • Facebook:  In the “Search” block at the top,

——–>

type in “key words” such as, “children, occupational therapy, or education.”  If you have a favorite Facebook page that discusses children’s activities, click on its “Likes” section and browse through the sites there.

 

 

  • Twitter:  In the top right-hand block, search  for hastags (#) such as “#pediOT,  #occupationaltherapy,  and  #handwriting”  —————————————–|
Again, if you have favorite Tweeters that you enjoy, take a look at their profiles and click on their “Follows” and “Followers” ———-> for more suggestions.

 

 

You will find more activities that you have summer-time for!

 

So how EXACTLY do you get creative?

Consider the things your child likes to do, and then expand or adapt to allow for greater targeted practice and skill development.

  1. exercise_girl_pushups_word classroom clipart comWith my students, I typically begin with a whole body task or activity, something that will get all the muscles and joints working.
  2. Next, I will try to use an activity that engages the shoulders, and
  3. then, we will move on to an activity that uses the small muscles of the hand and fingers.
  4. After all that, we get a little actual penmanship practice in, once the body is ready for that level of focus.

 

 

 

Strengthening both the core and fine-motor muscles helps to build the foundation for handwriting skill development.

 

Let’s see if this strategy will work for your child!

Let me share some movement activities that Engage and Strengthen the whole body and follow the strategy I described above.  (Who couldn’t benefit from these activities?)

First, A Word About Strengthening:

As with any strengthening program, begin with very small expectations, and slowly build the amount of time your child engages in these tasks or with these materials.

 

Here we go!

1.  First, try these activities to help to wake up and strengthen all of the muscles, including core muscles and the muscles of the arms and legs, all at the same time.

-Practice Simple Calisthenics (sit-ups, push-ups, jumping jacks, etc.).

-Ride a bike.

-Climb a tree.

-Visit the local park and climb/slide/swing on the playground equipment.

5 Kid-Friendly Yoga Poses From Mind-Body-Green.com

-Swim.

-Walk or run.  Bonus points for walking the dog!

-Learn Kids’ Yoga.

-Play soccer.

-Roll down a grassy hill.  (Be careful if, like me, you have a dog in your yard…)

-Include some Screen Time (believe it or not): Websites like GoNoOdle offer fun, brief “brain breaks” that involve movement and music. Many kids will be familiar with GoNoOdle because their teachers use it in their classrooms!

Looking for more activities?

Search all of the Internet sites listed above with keywords or hashtags: #grossmotor   #proprioception   #heavywork   #kidsexercise   #kidsyoga

 

2.  Next, try these to Engage the Shoulders and Arms.

These activities will help strengthen the larger muscles of the shoulder and arm, while still being fun and engaging, and will also help support bilateral coordination (using both sides of the body together).

-Play T-ball.

-Play tennis.

-Play on the floor on the tummy, propped up on elbows.

-Push-ups on the floor if your child can manage this, or against the wall:  Place arms shoulder height on a wall, approximately shoulder width apart. Take a step back from the wall.  SLOWLY bend the elbows, bringing the face close to the wall, then SLOWLY push the body back to the starting position.

-Rake the yard.

-Shovel Snow.  (Hey, it’s snowy in the Southern Hemisphere in June-August!)

-Carry bags with groceries from the car.

-Help carry laundry.

-Use a spray bottle with water and “wash” the windows using big arm movements.

-Play in a sandbox or on the beach with shovels, buckets, trucks, etc.

Making Bread Dough With “My Small Potatoes.com”

-Sweep the sidewalk or the house.

-Vacuum.   (Hey, some kids LOVE using the vacuum!)

-Knead bread dough.

-Create artwork with sidewalk chalk on the sidewalk or vertical chalkboard.

-“Paint” (using simply water and a 1-2″ paintbrush) on the garage door or sidewalk.

-Use the water and paintbrush idea to “erase” a picture drawn with sidewalk chalk outside.

For more activities, try these suggested searches or hashtags:   #bilateralcoordination   #shoulderstability   #shouldercoordination.

 

3.  Then, move on to Engage the Hands and Fingers.

These activities will support and strengthen the muscles and joints of the wrist, fingers, and thumb.  Bonus points if you combine several together creatively!

 

Turke 2-Play with playdough: roll it; pinch it; hide small objects within it and find them by pinching or twisting; cut rolls using scissors.

-Play with Silly Putty:  Use in the same activities as with the playdough.  Or create design “transfers” by pressing silly putty onto a newspaper comic or simple pencil drawing and peel away to reveal a picture.

Insert Q-tips into the holes in the tops of cleaned out spice containers.
Insert Q-tips into the holes in the tops of cleaned out spice containers.

-Insert Q-tips into the holes in the tops of cleaned out spice containers.

-Use small tongs or tweezers to pick up mini erasers or other small objects.

 

 

Push small pompoms into parmesan cheese containers.
Push small pompoms into parmesan cheese containers.

         Push small pompoms into parmesan cheese containers.

-Build with Duplo or Lego bricks.

-Rip up strips of paper, then use a mini “broom” and dustpan to sweep up the pieces.

-String fruit-loop type cereal onto yarn to make a necklace.

Create a bracelet using a rubber band loom.
Create a bracelet using a rubber band loom.

-Create a bracelet using a rubber band loom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here some suggested searches/hashtags  for more activities like these:

#finemotorskills   #eyehandcoordination   #graspingskills

 

4.  Now it’s time to write.

After all the above preparation, your child is ready for a little handwriting practice.  My recommendation is that, whatever process your child is using, whether it’s a structured, formal handwriting curriculum or if it’s something that is more teacher created, it is important to offer opportunities to practice each letter, numeral, or word repeatedly. After all, one time through a workbook is rarely enough for kids to demonstrate mastery of a skill.   If you don’t have a writing program provided by your child’s teacher or OT, you can easily find some type of handwriting practice workbook at your local Target, Walmart, or similar store.  You can also Google #freehandwritingworksheets  (or similar key words) and you will be able to choose from all sorts of free resources online.

 

What about those kids who HATE to practice?

Girl Writing Notebook raphaeljeanneret pixabaySome of my students hate to simply practice letters and numbers because they see no purpose in it. So we try these ideas:

  • We write notes to ourselves.
  • We send letters to their parents, grandparents, or friends.
  • My students make lists of the movies they want to see or of their favorite foods.
  • One student who was really into one particular online game spent a couple of weeks writing a tutorial of sorts for me, so that I could understand all the characters and powers. (Full disclosure: I still don’t understand much about the game, but I do have handwritten instructions prepared by a student who would have otherwise balked at writing!)

 

Mix it up!

Keep a box of different types of writing tools and materials readily available for your child.

  • Crayons, both primary sized and the more traditional sized.
  • Pencils, both traditional and mechanical, and pencil grips.
  • Water-color markers.
  • And papers, to include lined, unlined, and construction.

 

My favorite writing practice tip?

Take that workbook you’ve purchased or been given and either tear the pages out and place them into clear plastic page protectors in a binder, or use a clear plastic overlay on each page. Using a dry-erase marker, you’ve created reusable practice pages, and your child can practice over and over until letters and numbers are legible and written with ease.

 

My next best tip?

Aim for about 5-10 minutes of writing practice after the warm ups (above), several times per week in the summer.   If you can.   If you can’t…just make sure your child is playing, creating, and helping around the house.  Keep your approach light and playful, and you will have your child working on improving their handwriting all summer long…and he or she might not even know it’s work!

 

 

I have been employed in my dream job as an Occupational Therapist at a county-level intermediate school district for almost 30 years. My career has ranged from working in a “center-based” school to working in public and private schools throughout the county, including rural, suburban, and urban schools. I have been blessed to have been able to work with students with a wide range of educational needs, to include cognitive impairments, Autism Spectrum Disorder, physical challenges, sensory processing needs, and learning disabilities (plus many more). More recently, OT within the school district has broadened somewhat, giving me access to working with all students and their teachers, focusing on self-regulation, classroom design to enhance learning, and handwriting support. This career has been fulfilling, always presents new and interesting challenges, and is NEVER boring!  If you want to get in touch, you can reach me at sturke@inghamisd.org

 

 

Links to the rest of the series:

10 Tips for Summer Handwriting Fun
10 Tips for Summer Handwriting Fun
Spaghetti and Meatball Spacing From Miss Jaime OT
Spaghetti and Meatball Spacing From Miss Jaime OT
5 Nifty Handwriting Helpers
5 Nifty Handwriting Helpers

 

Stay tuned!  Next week, we will begin our Techie Series.  Hope to see you then!

Tips for Getting Away From Table-Top Activities
Tips for Getting Away From Table-Top Activities

Top 10 Handwriting Blog Posts for 2014!

Hello, to all my dedicated and loyal readers – and to each and every new follower that comes my way!  I am so excited this year to bring you the great news that the Handwriting is Fun! Blog has been a hit!  Let me take a moment of your “last day of the year” to share our Top 10 (all thanks to you!)

Drum Roll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRUM ROLL, PLEASE!

 

Part 2:  Problems with balance can sometimes signal poor body awareness skills.
Part 2: Problems with balance can sometimes signal poor body awareness skills.

10.  Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 2 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Secret Places to Practice Handwriting Handwriting With Katherine
Writing on the wall is okay!

9.   10 Secret Places to Practice Handwriting

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is writing just "too much" for the hand?"
Is writing just “too much” for the hand?”

8.  Modern Handwriting or Hieroglyphics?  Are they simply DRAWING? (Part 1)

 

 

 

 

 

Handwriting practice warms up the brain for writing activities!
Handwriting practice warms up the brain for writing activities!

7.  Handwriting Warm-ups to Writing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pencil stylus - now there's an idea!
Pencil stylus – now there’s an idea!

6.  Handwriting Skills:  Thinking of an app to help with that?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A q-tip helps develop the fine motor muscles of the hand for handwriting.
A q-tip helps develop the fine motor muscles of the hand for handwriting.

5.  My Handy Handwriting Tool Box

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fine-motor exercises that use everything in your pencil case!
Fine-motor exercises that use everything in your pencil case!

4.  5 Easy Fine Motor Warm-ups for Handwriting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 3:  Sometimes children will appear bored when they are struggling with poor memory skills.
Part 3: Sometimes children will appear bored when they are struggling with poor memory skills.

3.  Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning
Visual Perceptual Skills: The Keys to Learning

 2.  Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

AND NUMBER 1:

Slanted paper and a 3-ring binder can facilitate a fluid handwriting style.
Slanted paper and a 3-ring binder can facilitate a fluid handwriting style.

Posture, Paper Placement, & Pencil Grip:  3 Links to Handwriting Success

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you AGAIN to all of my blog and Facebook followers, sharers, pinners, and tweeters!  I could not have done it without you!

 

Happy New Year!

 

Katherine

 

Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L

Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L, is a pediatric occupational therapist who specializes in the assessment and remediation of handwriting skills and understands the link between handwriting skills and writing.  She can be contacted via her website, Handwriting With Katherine.
 
 Disclaimer: The information shared on the Handwriting With Katherine website, blog, Facebook page, Twitter page, Pinterest page; on any guest blog posts or any other social media is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice or evaluation and care from your physician/medical team or any other qualified health care providers. Therefore, the authors of these links/posts take no responsibility for any liability, loss, or risk taken by individuals as a result of applying the ideas or resources.

Handwriting Tips: Getting It Right The First Time (using the lessons in life)

Handwriting Tips:  Getting It Right The First Time (using the lessons in life)

by Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L

on the Handwriting is Fun! Blog

 

I have always been one to say, “Well, that was nice but next time….!”  I am never quite satisfied with the status quo.  If something didn’t happen quite the way I’d expected, I went on the hunt for a different way to approach it.  That’s not to say that I always found a better way – simply a different one.  Today I’d like to take some of those lessons learned and turn them into Handwriting Tips for Getting It Right the first Time!  Let’s go, shall we?

 

 

Tip 1: Never buy a house with a wet basement.
Tip 1: Never buy a house with a wet basement.

Tip #1:  Never buy a house with a wet basement.

Wet basements are the ultimate turn-off for me when I’m looking for a new home.  A soggy bottom means a weak foundation.  This hold true for handwriting skills, as well.  The early learning stages MUST be built soundly in order for a young writer to develop the appropriate skills for pencil grasp, letter formation and recognition, and fluid handwriting.  A weak foundation will result in lots of expensive “remodeling” later on!

 

 

Tip #2:  Birds do not nest in painted birdhouses.

Tip 2: Birds do not nest in painted birdhouses.
Tip 2: Birds do not nest in painted birdhouses.

Yes, that’s true!  When we purchased our nifty birdhouse a few years back, I asked the builder why he didn’t paint them?  He told me they were “put off” by the paint.  Voila!  A new fun fact is learned!  The same truth can be applied to handwriting practice.  If students who are struggling with handwriting skills are discouraged and put off by desk work and pencil-and-paper activities, then it is certainly counterproductive to ask them to spend time on them.  Handwriting practice and remediation can be accomplished with plenty of activities that get them up and moving, that provide them with opportunities for art work, or simply look like child’s play!  Painted birdhouses mean they will be empty.  No sense in that, eh?

 

 

Tip 3: Less is more!
Tip 3: Less is more!

Tip #3:  Less is more.

As my hubby and I are downsizing and getting ready to move to Arizona, we have come to realize that this saying has enormous value!  Phew!  Who knew that two people could accumulate so many useless things?  They must have been useless because some of them I haven’t even touched in the past 10 years!  Having “more” certainly didn’t make our life any better.  This same truth is a vital link for handwriting mastery.  Practicing letters or words over and over, whether they be on a chalkboard, paper, or in sand, can become tedious and boring.  Again, working on the fine and visual motor skills that lay the foundation is more fun and will enhance handwriting skills without your child even knowing he is practicing handwriting!  Less boring = more learning!

 

 

Tip  #4:  Don’t believe in coincidences.

Tip 4: Don't believe in coincidences.
Tip 4: Don’t believe in coincidences.

The old saying “It was meant to happen” is one that allows us to believe in coincidences.  If an event occurs, we can accept it without complaint and step away from the challenge of changing it.  Coincidences in handwriting are events that make it easy to accept sloppy and illegible skills.  They are the times when we say, “Well, we won’t need handwriting soon because technology will replace it.”  Or, “Why would I waste time on handwriting skills when he only needs to learn keyboarding?”  The increased use of technology and its capabilities is only a coincidence.  Handwriting skills have been and continue to be an important facet of learning – ones that continue to need instruction and remediation when they fall short.  Believing in coincidences can stand in the way of a child’s educational success.  Now was THAT meant to be?

 

 

Tip 5: Money doesn't grow on trees.
Tip 5: Money doesn’t grow on trees.

Tip #5:  Money doesn’t grow on trees.

It doesn’t?  Man, don’t dash my dreams just yet!  Funny, but I think I’ve heard just about every parent I’ve met say that to their child at least once in my presence!  Having money is a good thing, of course; but, as we’ve all learned in the end, it needs to be earned and saved.  Handwriting mastery works the same way.   The skills a child needs for fluid and legible handwriting must be taught using a STRUCTURED PROGRAM, with CONSISTENT PRACTICE, and with GUIDANCE.   They don’t simply grow on trees naturally where they can be plucked off when we need them.  They grow with practice and remediation.

 

 

 

 

 
The Handwriting is Fun! Blog is published by and is the property of Handwriting With Katherine. 

Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L, owner, Handwriting With Katherine
Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L, owner, Handwriting With Katherine

Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L, is a pediatric occupational therapist who specializes in the assessment and remediation of handwriting skills. In her current book, Handwriting Development Assessment and Remediation: A Practice Model for Occupational Therapists, she shares a comprehensive guide and consistent tool for addressing handwriting development needs. She can be contacted via her website, Handwriting With Katherine.

Collmer Handwriting Development Assessment and Remediation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictures above that are the property of the author and link to an attachment page must provide a link back to this article or her website.

Pictures that are the property of an outside site should include the link provided with the photo to give proper credit to their owners.

Disclaimer: The information shared on the Handwriting With Katherine website, blog, Facebook page, Twitter page, Pinterest page; in the Universal Publishing Handwriting Teachers’ Guides; on any guest blog posts or any other social media is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice or evaluation and care from your physician/medical team or any other qualified health care providers. Therefore, the author of these links/posts take no responsibility for any liability, loss, or risk taken by individuals as a result of applying the ideas or resources.

 

 

Visual Perceptual Skills: The Keys to Learning – Part 4

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 4, Handwriting With KatherineIn our previous articles, we discussed the first six skills in the Visual Perceptual Skill Set:

·      Visual Attention
·      Visual Discrimination
·      Position in Space
·      Visual Spatial Relations
·      Visual Memory
·      Visual Sequential Memory
·      Visual Form Constancy
·      Visual Closure
·      Figure Ground

 

 

It was apparent that these skills set the stage for our ability to pay attention to our tasks, to understand the relationship between our bodies and space, and to use our memory for literacy development.

 

We will continue on our journey of discovery by taking a look at the final three visual perceptual skills:

Visual Form Constancy, Visual Closure, and Figure Ground.

 

7. Visual Form Constancy is our ability to “mentally turn and rotate objects in our minds and picture what they would look like.”  It allows us to recognize forms, letters, or objects regardless of their size, color, or position in space (upside down, sideways, or inverted).

a. Children who have difficulty with visual form constancy will often exhibit these signs:

(1) Difficulty mastering the alphabet or numbers.

(2) Difficulty with reading familiar letters or words when presented in a different style of print (as in books or on the computer).

(3) Difficulty recognizing familiar objects when viewed from an angle or other than an upright position.

(4) Difficulty transitioning from manuscript to cursive letters.

(5) Difficulty judging the size of an object regardless of the distance away from him.

 

b. Activities that enhance visual form constancy include:

(1) Multi-sensory activities for learning the alphabet provide the child with visual models for different “views” of the same object.  Shapes, colors, and manipulatives provide visual and tactile input that contrubutes to the recognition that one object (a letter or number) is the same despite orientation and/or characteristics.

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 4, Handwriting With Katherine
Grocery store excursions can be more fun when they become learning experiences!

(2) Copying shapes or designs using pegboards or parquetry kits provide the visual-motor movement that encourages the development of visual form constancy.

(3) Practice this skill during every day activities such as reading signs at the grocery store, identifying letters in books or magazines using different fonts, or looking through labels on clothing or toys.

 

 

8. Visual Closure is our ability to view an incomplete form and visually fill in the missing details in order to identify it.   This is an abstract problem solving skill that involves many of the skills listed above.

a. Children who have difficulty with visual closure will often exhibit these signs:

(1) Tendency to leave out parts of words or entire words, as well as failing to complete portions of worksheets.

(2) Inability to copy a familiar form if he cannot see the entire picture.

(3) Difficulty with dot-to-dot activities or puzzles.

(4) Difficulty with self-editing of his handwritten material.

(5) Difficulty with spelling.

 

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 4 Handwriting With Katherine
Art is a wonderful medium for enhancing visual skills!

b. Activities that enhance visual closure include:

(1) Stencils, coloring, and model activities provide opportunities to construct a “whole” from a collection of “parts.”

(2) Matching word sizes to boxes drawn in the same shape, or worksheets that ask the child to find hidden shapes among the overlay of various shapes, provide opportunities to visually recall the “end product” in order to find the correct answer.

(3) Playing with different text fonts, either or the computer or in print, provides visual recognition of the same letter in various designs.

 

 

9. Figure Ground Discrimination is our ability to identify shapes and objects that are “hidden” within a “busy” environment.  It allows us to reach into the silverware drawer and select the proper utensil although they are not sorted by type.   It also gives us the skill to attend to the activity at hand without being visually distracted by the environment surrounding us.

a. Children who have difficulty with figure ground will often exhibit these signs:

(1) Difficulty filtering out visual distractions in the room (e.g., items hanging from the ceiling or busy bulletin boards).

(2) Difficulty sorting and organizing personal belongings, appearing to be careless or disinterested in his personal space.

(3) Tendency to “over attend to details and miss the big picture.”

(4) Difficulty locating friends or relatives in a crowded room or playground.

(5) Difficulty with reading a book or copying words or sentences from the board, often skipping over words or paragraphs.

 

b. Activities that enhance figure ground include:

(1) Finding words in the dictionary or in the newspaper, as well as locating them on signs in the environment, provides “every day experience” that enhances carry-over skills.

(2) Tracing, mazes, word searches, and dot-to-dot activities assist in encouraging the eyes to locate and maintain focus on a specific point on the paper while utilizing visual-motor movement to enhance the memory of the skills.

(3) Hidden pictures, puzzles, and arts and craft activities, as well as sorting clothes from the laundry, provide excellent opportunities for the eyes to locate and maintain focus upon a sought-after object.

 

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 4, Handwriting With Katherine

 

Our vision is so important to our ability to learn about ourselves and our world around us that, in the words of Dr. David Hubel,  without visual stimulation,  we could not recognize the “patterns and contours of the world around” us.

 

Thank you so much for joining me on this journey of discovery to unlock the secrets of our Visual Perceptual Skills!  And, as always, thanks for reading!

 

 

Did you miss Parts, 1, 2, or 3?  You can catch them here!

 

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 1, Handwriting  With Katherine
Part 1: The Cotton Ball Game is an excellent “attention-getter!”

 

Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 2, Handwriting With Katherine
Part 2: Problems with balance can sometimes signal poor body awareness skills.
Visual Perceptual Skills:  The Keys to Learning, Part 3, Handwriting With Katherine
Part 3: Sometimes children will appear bored when they are struggling with poor memory skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katherine J. Collmer, M.Ed., OTR/L, is a pediatric occupational therapist who owns and operates a clinic that specializes in the assessment and remediation of handwriting skills.  She can be contacted via her website, Handwriting With Katherine.

 

 

Disclaimer: The information shared on the Handwriting With Katherine website, blog, Facebook page, Twitter page, Pinterest page; the Wellness For Life:  Cape Cod blog; or any other social media is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as a substitute for sound professional medical advice or evaluation and care from your physician/medical team or any other qualified health care providers. Therefore, the authors of these links/posts take no responsibility for any liability, loss, or risk taken by individuals as a result of applying the ideas or resources.
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